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of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
the past year, we have seen great progress [inaudible] leading the way. but just as the u.k. deficit is not balanced with the government public transport issue are not solved in one year. we're public transport continued a national priority. we can't -- [inaudible] for the like of my young cousin. we can deliver more transport to get students from point a to point b. we can build a better, brighter future for young people. so when the opposition argument say it's not a national campaign, a focus of the divided region. i tell you this, divided we are weak, but united are the nation we are strong. more nation, one notion, one campaign. better public transport. [applause] [applause] >> thank you very much ib keyed for that. i note we have been joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly
on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should always say their name and region at the beginning of their speech. otherwise -- the official record of our proceedings will be deficient. the writers will not know who you are unless you say. if you be good enough to pause, momentarily, before you start your speech, that will give an opportunity for the microphone to be activated. your gain here -- you're going to hear from the leader of the house and the leader, whom is my delight to welcome here today. leader of the house andrew, and angela. and the parliament tear undersecretary of state at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message fro
about the contrast between the u.k. and the united states which i think is revealing, and some world's about -- words about challenges facing the world economy which is more important than those facing individual countries alone. the united kingdom was hit very badly by the financial crisis. total gdp fell by 6% between the peak at the beginning of 2008 and the trough in the second quarter of 2009. output still remains 3% below the peak level. and more than 15% below levels that output would have reached have the long run average growth rate merely continued. on top of that, the inflation rate has been a 2% target. and in the wake of the financial crisis, the budget deficit reached a level of 11% of gdp, a good part of that being structural. we have serious problems to contend with when trying to put in place an economic recovery program in 2009-2010. it was clear at that point that the u.k. needed a major rebalancing of our economy. the shift of spending away from consumption, private and public and toward the net exports whether exports or production to compete with imports. the st
july, 2011. up .5%. yields coming down during the session yesterday. employment numbers out of the u.k. in around 15 minutes or so. we'll keep our eyes on that. yields also -- treasury yields, 1.67%. gild yields, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's det
export performance, creating jobs in the manufacturing sector. but germany and the uk need europe to improve. >> it comes at an inkrd eblly high cost in terms of the number of people out of work. what has been done? how much have we destroyed so that the jobs outlook and growth prospect in this country? >> well, what growth prospect in the southern european countries? we're seeing definitive bifurcation of northern europe and southern europe. southern europe, we are creating an underclass of long-term, especially youth unemployed that is going to give us a problem when the economies eventually start to get into balance and start to pick up. we still have this issue, even though we have tens of millions of people out of work, we still can't find the right skills and the right time. >> you mentioned the uk. the unemployment picture never got that bad in britain. so what happens now? why did it outperform? >> the uk is so different from the rest of europe. we've got london, the financial services sector, that didn't actually, in terms of job numbers, get hit as hard as the rest of eu
between us is we won the large multinational companies to pay proper taxes here in the u.k.. we believe you do that by having lower tax rate and we reduce the rate of corporation tax but by making sure they declare their income properly. that is why on this specific issue of transfer, companies have been pursuing strange practices to pretend there revenues aren't delivered in the u.k. and run down their tax bills. .. >> the entry of the energy bill to parliament now means we can get out there and sell to all of the energy companies the very clear and stable framework that the u.k. has for offshore wind, for nuclear, for renewables and, indeed, for gas. i think it's a very positive development, there's a huge amount of potential, pent-up investment, and we need to make sure that results in british jobs and apprenticeships, and the government is fully committed to making that happen. >> [inaudible] pruitt. >> the prime minister obviously believes within the leveson report, there exists something that is bonkers. how would the prime minister give the views of his planning minister
in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss regulators $59 million in profits because the regulator can't fine ubs. the fine from the fsa is the biggest ever, 160 million pounds, $1.2 billion will go to the u.s. regulators. so the second biggest fine that was ever handed to a financial institution. of course, following that $1.9 billion fine that was given to hsbc. what we do know is that the company is admitting criminal wrongdoing in its japanese arm b
ourses to our international competitors, our economy here in the uk is growing by 0.6%, whereas in germany, we've seen growth of 3.6%. in the u.s., growth of #.1% during the same period. so certainly not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might
very cautious trading. we have industrial production coming out of the uk. if worse than expected, may get a negative q4 for the uk. italian yields are higher. spanish 5.54, just nudging a little higher. bunds down 1.29d% after the downgrade by the bundesbank, as well. draghi says we discussed it and again a big town great in inflation forecast, as well. some saying maybe they still won't, but it does knock the euro-dollar, 1.29d 25 is where we stand. dollar-yen 82.37. we talked about the yen in relation to what was going on with the earthquake. aussie dollar below 1.05. sterling-dollar just slightly weaker. that's where we stand as far as the european markets are concerned. let's get a wrap of the final trading day in asia this week. >> asian markets wrapped up the week on a mixed note. shanghai composite gained 1.6% and it's up over 4% on the week. stocks related to citi growth continued to surge as the new urbanization plan is aiming to boost investment plan. agriculture stocks up today on support policies. hang seng dragged lower by utility stocks. picc staged a strong trading debu
to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sweden and the uk that they opted out of the banking supervision or whether that's good news for them in that sense that they opted out and had their way. bottom line is, we have an agreement. that's the most important thing. otherwise, they threaten meetings going between the years leading up to christmas because everybody agrees that we might have a type of agreement before the year is out. the agreement that is on the table, ecb will be the banking supervisor. the straightforward ecb supervisory council will be flanked by two other committees, a mediation committee and a steering committee. the personnel of this
are telling some american companies it is time to start paying their fair share there in the uk. even throwing around terms such as shame, outrageous when talking about it. executives from google, amazon, and starbucks all appeared before a parliamentary committee looking into how international companies minimize the tax they pay in the uk. richard quest is in london to explain it all. now, richard, not necessarily talking about tax evasion here. it's more like avoidance, minimization, what's the concern? >> reporter: that's exactly the point. the companies are not breaking the law, not doing anything wrong. the accounts committee described their actions as immoral claiming they have r. so arranging their tax affairs so as to pay no tax in the country where the money is earned. this applies to google, which uses ireland, applies to amazon, on the continent, and it applies to starbucks in amsterdam. what we learned is how these companies arrange their affairs. so even though the latte is bought in london, no tax is ever paid except on sales tax to the uk government. i need to demonstrate this t
us is allen higgins, chief investment officer for the uk coutts. good morning. >> good morning. >> so we've had 12 years of exposure to gold. you're limiting it now. why? >> it's starting to lag, but more subtly from a portfolio construction perspective, it's lost its negative correlation. for example, quarter 2010, well, euro crisis won when we had equity markets down a lot then gold really surged forward, giving a negative correlation. and so for the portfolio manager at coutts, it has been at times a legal high gold exposure surging upwards in times of stress. for those days seem to have gone. trimming it. that is a fact that there's a real shortage of low risk investments of on german bunch negative. >> but you're saying it's trading like other risk assets at the moment. >> at times, it's correlated with em. so it's less attractive from a portfolio construction perspective as compared to what it was. >> it's fascinating because we've been talking about one theme for 2013 being is it a stock picker's market, are we seeing less differentiation, what you're saying would suggest that
favorite example, which i went back and looked at it kind of horrified me. uk's might remember this widely reported. in january 2007, think about that date january 2007, mike bloomberg and chuck schumer, commissioned a report from mckenzie when new york was falling behind compared to london. to be the support you can google it in 30 seconds. it's shocking the main problem, the single biggest thing holding back the u.s. economy is overly harsh regulation of credit derivatives. it's in this report you will start a section on credit derivatives, how we need less regulation of them otherwise london will take over global finance. what was amazing at the time is everybody agreed that this report. eliot spitzer was quoted saying how great this was. chuck schumer was one of the sponsors in the u.k. labor was running the u.k. and even the critics said this report showed that even the labor is kind of spending far too much money on the nhs at least they give regulation right. so there was a very widespread bipartisan kind of economic faculties of the western world bought into this and that played a
. it is quite an unprecedented move for the u.k. and other european states to some and israeli ambassadors to try to -- to summon israeli ambassadors to try to pressure them. it is always easier for them to maneuver around it. i think it will be interesting to see if crime and not -- prime minister erdogan yahoo! will be -- it will be interesting to see what prime minister netanyahu has to say in the coming days. >> what is israel planning to build on? >> this is a very significant area we are talking about. it is an area east of jerusalem, it collects -- the next a large settlement to jerusalem. it would cut off east jerusalem from the west bank. it would make it impossible to have a connection between east jerusalem and the west bank. this has been married controversial, -- the e1 area has been very controversial. there is a red line for the international community that has been crossed, which is why we are seeing those strong reactions. >> thank you for that. in that egypt top judges have agreed to -- >> egypt's top judges have agreed to oversee a referendum. this comes a day after they
, for example, the uk, it's actually a relatively small amount. if japan tries a much larger qe event, surely we go down the route of the uk which in and of itself does not demonstrate a huge increase in inflation and a huge increase in market growth, either. >> arguably, that is one of the problems with the huge task that the boj has ahead of it. people progress in terms of growth, japan has bigger problems, much bigger problems in terms of the demographic in terms of the structural hold back. so there are a lot of sectors at play now. i think one of the names that the boj has is whether this will work or not. but if were looking at it more from a yen perspective, certainly two things are going to drive the yen are going to be the relative price of the boj balance sheets with respect to, perhaps, the fed and the ecb and the other being the jgb. >> and briefly, in summary, what are your favorite strategic calls? >> the strategic calls for us are going to be buying the rupee against the yen. we are looking for the yen to depreciate further and keeping our fingers cross on some policy upside comin
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
capped. spain requesting financial assistance. we'll keep our eye on the uk as we head toward the bank of england meeting this week p. dollar index has hit a one month low. you're redollar up to euro-dollar up near the high we saw yesterday. dollar-yen moving away from the 7 1/2 month high. rebounding against the dollar and the euro ir, as well. priced in a lot in terms of monetary policy out of japan. and aussie dollar, 1.0463, yes, we have cut the cash rate in australia to match the record low of 3%. but we see the aussie dollar rise because it's pretty much all priced in. sterling-dollar also getting a benefit. back over 1.61. so that's where we stand in european trade. let's recap the asian trading session for the first time today, when you not the last. >> thank you, ross.not the last. >> thank you, ross. shanghai composite recovered from its four year low as property financials, rebounded. shale gas and geothermal plays also rallied as beijing plans to cut its annual coal consumption target by 2015. the hang seng finished m eed marginally in the green. losses in the services sect
irish fan, so hopefully not. >> is dolmen all over the uk? >> that's correct. they're predominantly in ireland, but you look at ireland right now, they're actually going through the reforms. they're trying to inject money in a credit fashion into their economy. and we certainly think we can bring our fixed income expertise and continue to help them. >> that would make sense for cantor. ireland was the mf-will first they were in trouble, then the model for the world. what got them into trouble again, housing or real estate or something or bad banks or -- and now again they're kind of a model for everyone on how to handle it. is that basically the last five years? >> absolutely. certainly was a real estate bubble there. now there are austerity measures being put in place and they're actually following through on the austerity measures. so certainly they'll come out first and actually look pretty good. >> so where is the most business for you for cantor in ireland, what will you be doing? >> certainly it's an equity based firm. we'll bring our fixed income expertise, probably become th
are in place in scandinavia and in germany and the u.k. and reshaped those market forces, and the way we shape those market forces has been the result of the least equality of opportunity contrary to our image of our self. it's really a myth. the countries that have imitated the united states have done like the united states. the u.k. used to be in the middle of the elite table and now we are expecting of the income inequality whereas it struggled and inequality has increased a little bit but it is still the least -- the most the quality of opportunity. .. even canada is, less harsh society than ours and the same environment we are, speak the same language, these are choices and choices about how we run markets. the distribution of marketing, there is a lot you can do, it is choice about what you do after words as well, providing universal health coverage or provide decent support or an educational system that is well funded for everybody, not just people in the right neighborhoods. >> and the tax system is obviously important, not only for inequality opportunity, but also growth. so for insta
and the uk government on following the lead of the scottish government and scottish parliament in its using equal marriage minimum pricing for alcohol and previously on the smoking ban. given the fact that unemployment is now lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, will he follow the lead of the scottish government by introducing a more shovel-ready measures for economic growth? >> i think what the honorable gentleman will find is because of the measures taken in the autumn statement, there's an extra 300 million pounds for the scottish government to spend, so if they want to spend that on shovel-ready measures they can. but i certainly am happy to say that when good policies are introduced in any party, in the united kingdom to i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> order. statements, the prime minister. >> here on c-span2 we will leave the british house of commons now as they move onto other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's questions time era questions time error of life wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern of parliament is in session. you can see thi
is 2.4% more than the u.k. will the prime minister be gracious enough to congratulate iceland on working hard? >> if the case for an independent scotland is make us more like iceland, i am not sure i would -- that would totally recommend itself to the voters. i have a very good relations and i will make sure that remains the case. >> can i welcome the unemployment, where unemployment has fallen steadily, i urge the prime minister -- steadily. >> i am grateful for the point. we will continue for the use contract, and worked experience. what we are seeing is large numbers of people who go into work experience come off benefits, by a job, and find it is a good start to a career and a working career. that is what we want to see. i thank you. unemployment in scotland [indiscernible] is the prime minister as shocked as i am that some managers were encouraging employers to go into unpaid walk-in experience placements? will the prime minister condemn this practice immediately? >> an important point. we want work experience places to the additional places, encouraging more young people
in u.k. after she and prince william got exciting news. we have tell you about that next on "the five." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> eric: 29 days until taxes jump and spending on everything from defense, medicare and farm suddies are slashed. geithner and bane spinning away on the sunday talk circuit. i'd roll the video but we prefer you stay awake for the segment. listen to rush limbaugh shed some light. >> why would he want to go over the cliff? what happens when we go over the cliff? democrat orgasm happens. taxes go up for everybody. nirvana to these people. >> eric: i will disagree with rush. it's good for the g.o.p. to call obama's bluff. one or two results will follow us over the cliff. we go back to recession. that will hurt but the economy will roar back. maybe, just maybe, zombies for obama will realize he has no clue when it comes to the economy. or we don't double dip to the recession. and the debt dissolves to pay the way for the 2016 conservatives. take your chance and take medicine now. over the long run, better for the economy. >> kimberly: call his bluff. be strong at the nego
. as you can see there, the uk gilt is telling offer a little bit. yield riding to 1.78%. whether it's the bund or even yields in spain are falling as prices rise a little bit. so there is light at the end of the tunnel according to our next guest. he says the global economy is close to reaching its weakest point before recovery sets in. he's robert cohen, chief equity strategist. woke. >> good morning. >> we just heard rob doddson talking through some of these results. unfortunately, we saw some signs of weaker demand, especially global demand in these reports. but perhaps what is consistent with what you're saying, why is it your view that that is going to happen? >> sometimes you need to pull away. you move away from the fundamentals a little bit on the month to month improvements. if you look at 2013 as a whole, the big headwinds you've had in a number of years, fiscal austerity is largely the sarp in europe year on year. 2014, that comes up quite quickly. 2013 is largely going to be the final year of the crushing deleveraging if you like on the european banks. so essentially the
as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's leaders just wrapped up a major conference. >>> and japan's prime minister election is calling on the bank
has been hospitalized in u.k. after she and prince william got exciting news. we have tell you about that next on "the five." ♪ ♪ why is it that the most impressive technology often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. ♪ ♪ >> eric: 29 days until taxes jump and spending on everything from defense, medicare and farm suddies are slashed. geithner and bane spinning away on the sunday talk circuit. i'd roll the video but we prefer you stay awake for the segment. listen to rush limbaugh shed some light. >> why would he want to go over the cliff? what happens when we go over the cliff? democrat orgasm happens. taxes go up for everybody. nirvana to these people. >> eric: i will disagree with rush. it's good for the g.o.p. to call obama's bluff.
brash, but he was of u.n. ambassador -- again, query whether that was a good match -- and she would be u.k. ambassador, but they say she doesn't want the job. she's happily installed over at voc and i hear -- can at vogue, and i hear working on a piece on you. >> me? i'll be on jon stewart with this, guaranteed. [laughter] megyn: thanks for being here, stu. we're taking your thoughts on that, follow me on twitter @megyn kelly, let me know what you think about ambassador win tour. >>> what started as a routine traffic stop ended as anything but as police made a dramatic discovery in the trunk of this car. that okays next. >>> plus, an estimated 75,000 soldiers to capture syria's chemical weapons supply. just ahead, why that is a growing concern as we get reports the syrians are mixing up batches of nerve agents right now. megyn: well, what started as a routine traffic stop ended as anything but after police in kentucky discovered what looked like an attempted kidnapping. trace gallagher live in l.a. with the details. trace? >> reporter: sean loamer says he was just closing up where he works
at a situation where governments, just like in the uk, have to come one a support mechanism to make that economically viable. so i think that's going to be the saying across the world. that is quite expensive here in europe. i don't necessarily see europe as a whole changing its mind and going from nuclear. if you take germany, for example, why did they change their mind? obviously, there were safety concerns but probably more importantly, it was to do with the ballot box. there was quite a bit of opposition, people out on the streets protesting and in the end of the days, the politicians decided to take what i considered to be a political course rather than an economic one. >> i don't think we would describe it as positively rosy just yet. we're saying that the storm clouds are listing. but as you're hinting, there are big question marks about growth in 2013, particularly in the euro area where we're not expecting very much more than a flat economy at best. key thing for the investment markets, as you know, is that gdp growth is only a small part of the story. a lot depends on what
of with the british system, and in the u.k. incentivize with the preventive checks, blood pressure, cholesterol, urine checks and in the hospital, they get incentivized and rewarded. in massachusetts if the doctor does not save them money, then the doctors get penalized. stuart: and how do you judge, is it cost per patient per lifetime that the doctor is judged on? >> so what's happening here is that doctors are entering into contracts with insurance companies and they're given what's called a global budget. and they get a set amount of money to take care of a patient. if they look after those patients economically and save money they're rewarded. if they do not look after patients and spend money excessively and doctors are penalized and they're tracking it. stuart: that's interesting. let's suppose you've got a universe of 200 patients for one doctor. we'll give you x number of dollars to treat 200 people. you go above the dollars you're going to get penalized and come out of your pocket. keep below that number, the total cost of 200. you're incentivized and keep the difference. >> that's how it wor
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
that will get smaller and smaller and smaller. the uk, well under 2. china, 1.55. we know they've actually implemented policies because they want to control population. in the bigger picture, fooling around with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a
and will probably happen in europe. the u.k. specialized in being the home of trading. they certainly don't want that to be taxed. so yes, there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns, or at least it is in the running for number one. i have been to washington many times and am involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. >> let's give a round of applause for lynn. [applause] we have the opportunity for you to purchase and have the book signed. we thank you all for being here. if you have further questions, she will be here signing books, so come and talk to her. >> in the fall of 1774, the british admiral and generals and diplomats were reporting to the crown that the colonists for sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and so-called subversive acts. it is
know now that she's pregnant. she's being looked after by the top doctors in the u.k. they would argue. we'll see what happens. certainly we're going to be here for a few days, ashleigh. monitoring the situation for you. senior royals have been informed. prince harry, they're trying to get ahold of to inform him. prince william is in there supporting her. >> just quickly, while we're all excited about a royal pregnancy and the lavishness of their lives and all the rest. it can't be understated she could be pregnant with a future king or queen. >> well, it's interesting, this debate because you would understand from what politicians have told you that they have changed the act of succession to allow the first born, if it is a girl, to become queen. that's not actually the case. very, very complicated legal procedures have to be gone through. they haven't even identified the laws that they have to change in order to do that. they go back hundreds of years. there's a committee in new zealand that's debating this. there are several countries, 15 countries, that have to agree to change this
. as i said, there's been a coordinated crackdown around the world of anti-bribery law in the u.k. and a big run in russia. corruption is everywhere. >> why isn't the united states further up the ranking? >> part of the problem and united states is always ranked around this area below top 10%. what they say is a lot of it has to do with just corruption not being enough of a priority. they say that the financial crisis changed some of that and people are starting to pay attention and citing a poll that 80% of americans believe that the financial crisis was the result of some public corruption. so it's more in the consciousness there and that affects the perception. it still has a long way to go. >> fascinating. thanks very much. >>> still ahead this morning, we've seen a wide range of companies unloading special dividends this quarter. have the nonissuing companies now made the wrong move. we'll take a deeper dive into that and talk about names that have yet to declare one and what it means for them ahead of the fiscal cliff. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately
. and increasing the funding for the uk by over 25% a year. so they can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position as the number one destination in europe for foreign investment. we are launching a new 1.5 billion pounds export finance facility to support the purchase of british export. [cheers] third, we are addressing the credit problems of companies we are providing it with 1 billion pounds of extra capital which will leave her either planning to help small firms and bring together existing ones. fourth, we are going to cut business taxes go further. let me tell you how. the temporary doubling of the small business rate relief scheme helps the small firms were 350,000 firms paying pay no right at all. the last government, we will end it in 2011, we have already extended its next april. and i extended by a further year to april 2014. we also confirmed the tax relief for our employees and shareholders. the energy bills provide renewable energy and we publish our gas strategy today to make sure that we make the best use of lower-cost
states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise. i was pleased to mention the senior games in cleveland next year, 2013. i will be participating in spending because authority qualified because you have qualified the year before. my questions are multiple. first i'll cut in medicare advantage plans have a fair amount of criticism during the discussion of
at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like amer
heard anything at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. --s beamed in illegally by you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that
and it has worked extremely well and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients to graduate with more debt than middle and upper income students. they are anywhere from 150% more likely to graduate. we are burdening those the least capable of the most that. the problem is that they are going to impact access. >> the point before you go on, a lot of that is about communicating to families what this means. it is far from perfect, but they are borrowing well beyond their families capability, baking on the fact that they will be able to. i don't disagree that there isn't a perfect model, but i think it has huge potential. >> i want to move on to questions from the audience because i want to get in as many as possible. i think what is interesting, so far, there seems to be a
europe and people in the u.k. and throughout the world. my hope is we are going to get the deal done. >> we have three weeks or so to play with at least this year some say. is that feasible knowing what you know? >> i think what you have to realize is there has to be a down payment. president outlined what he wants for that down payment on revenue side. let's have rates go back up which was the underlying assumption that was included in the whole simpson-bowles plan. the gang of six plan embraced that as well. brought the rates back up to 39%. you could still do tax reform after that to bring them back down and eliminate the tax expenditures. that's a good starting point. will we fully get through tax reform and entitlement reform by the end of the year? obviously not. what i fear is let's not continue to negotiate this into the 11th hour. every day that we go on during this period, during retail season, you hold back consumers which we know consumer confidence is two-thirds of the economy. folks are not buying stuff because they don't know what will happen come the beginning of the
. concerns over the uk economy. so we'll see how investors take to what's probably going to be a loosening up of the budget targets the chancellor set when they came into power. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and at the moment today, more talks in brussels. the greeks now getting their buy back program approved 37 trying to sort out a single supervisor. i think these talks will be fairly tricky because there is a majority who bt with a tant the be supervisor for all the banks. german didn't like that. so those talks will go on longer than originally hoped. but we are marginally higher going to the u.s. open. thank you. >> kelly, thank you. i'll just call you r kelly in now. >> that's not bad. >> ross, thank you. great to see you. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, alu
making news on this saturday. the uk is joining the united states in saying syria is now preparing to use chemical weapons. meanwhile, syrian rebels chose a former officer to lead their unified group. the new commander had defected from the syrian military. also today, the syrian military dropped rockets on to damascus. under rebel control. >>> the los angeles police department looking for new clues in the 15-year-old murder mystery of rapper notorious b.i.g. they're looking into biggie's death again. yesterday police released his autopsy for the first time, hoping to generate some new tips. but family says they want more information. the rapper died in a 1997 drive-by shooting in los angeles. >>> and the second winner of last month's powerball jackpot has come forward, but is not showing his face. arizona lottery official says the winner claimed his prize, but decided to remain anonymous, which is allowed under state law there. the officials say the man is in his 30s and will walk away with a cool $192 million before uncle sam comes a knocking. >>> turning back to domestic politics now.
when it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long- term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? proposalhe president's and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. they are al
, italy, france and the uk. this comes one day after a federal judge denied a request by apple to ban u.s. sales of samsung smart phone models. the devices in questions are the ones that a jury back in august say illegally used apple technology. at that time apple had been awarded $1.1 billion in damages. >>> the markets, dow looks like it will open up about $68 points higher. s&p up about 10 points, the nasdaq up 22.5 points coming on some of this news that we may be getting closer on the fiscal cliff. let's check out what's going on in asia. hang seng was down off marginally. shanghai composite up marginally and the nikkei up as well. quickly in europe, you can take a look at what's going on there. the ftse up about 0.38%. cac flat, and the german dax up about 0.5. >> the white house is proposing a new deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. let's get to steve liesman with more of the details. >> you're surprised, aren't you? >> isn't it happening. >> soon as they want it done they can do it. >> you said it this morning. it's a fictitious thing. we're going to show you the movement in just a
. and pervasive, they call it manipulation of libor by dozens of staff. the penalty was agreed to with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators. it is more than three times the $450 million fine that was levied on barclays in june. the second largest fine ever on a paid -- paid by a bank. it only was topped by the $1.9 billion penalty that hsbc agreed to last week to settle that money laundering probe. >> crazy thing that stock's up. it's leading the exchange there today because people had been expecting maybe a slightly higher fine even than that. three times the amount. it was supposedly taking place for five to seven years, 30 to 40 traders have left. pretty pervasive. >> i wonder how much they -- they make money or lose money after -- >> after all was said and done. $1.5 billion. >> probably lost. they did well. the libor stuff, if you can set rates -- >> well, and the crazy thing, it affects so many different instruments and so many people and so many businesses. >> right. >> i don't know that you could ever actually figure out all the implications from it. >> right. from everyone. and in a related
look particularly appealing here, due in part to signs of resilience in u.k. gdp growth. so we've had the european close. meantime, bob joins me here at post nine with a look at not just europe but what we're doing here state side. >> sort of moving sideways and consolidating. a little news on night capital. just got off the phone with tommy joyce, who is now the executive chairman. take a look at night here. remember the deal. they've sold. they sold to geico here. a rather complicated deal. a two-to-one cash to ratio stock. again, i did talk to tommy. he said he'll be working there on a daily basis. none of these absent chairman things. he's going to be a hands-on guy. certainly a relief to everyone. everyone wants tommy joyce involved in their business. dan coleman will be spending half his time in chicago and half his time in jersey city. very interesting dynamic going on here. sort of a working partnership between the two of them. tommy insisted to me this is a complementary merger. that is true. given it's $720 million or so, how are you going to pay for it? are they going to se
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